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Glucosamine-induced glycation of hydrolysed meat proteins in the presence or absence of transglutaminase: Chemical modifications and taste-enhancing activity

Hong, Pui Khoon and Ndagijimana, Maurice and Betti, Mirko (2016) Glucosamine-induced glycation of hydrolysed meat proteins in the presence or absence of transglutaminase: Chemical modifications and taste-enhancing activity. Food Chemistry, 197. pp. 1143-1152. ISSN 03088146

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Abstract

Salt reduction in food is a challenging task. The food processing sector has adopted taste enhancers to replace salt partially. In this study, a flavour enhancer formulation (liquid seasoning) was produced using enzymatically hydrolysed poultry proteins isolate (PPI). The PPI obtained through the isoelectric solubilisation precipitation process (ISP) was hydrolysed with Alcalase and glycated with glucosamine (GlcN) at moderate temperatures (37/50 �C) in the presence or absence of transglutaminase (TGase). The glycated hydrolysates showed reduced fluorescence advanced glycated end-products (AGE) and a reduced amount of alpha-dicarbonyl compounds (a-DC). An untrained consumer panel ranked the meat protein hydrolysate seasoning saltier than the salty standard seasoning solution (p < 0.05) regardless of GlcN glycation (both tested at 0.3 M Na+). GlcN treatments showed a tendency (p = 0.0593) to increase savouriness. Free glutamic acid and free aspartic acid found in the PPI hydrolysate likely increased the salty perception.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: Indexed by Scopus
Uncontrolled Keywords: Isoelectric solubilisation and precipitation process; Maillard reaction; Poultry protein isolate; Glucosamine; Salty; Savoury
Subjects: Q Science > Q Science (General)
Faculty/Division: Faculty of Industrial Sciences And Technology
Depositing User: Dr. Hong Pui Khoon
Date Deposited: 05 Jun 2018 02:54
Last Modified: 05 Jun 2018 02:54
URI: http://umpir.ump.edu.my/id/eprint/20014
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